Be Your Own Guru

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Do not go where the path may lead; go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. ~ Ralph Waldo Emerson

I spent the better part of the first 40-years of my life looking for a guru, that person who would just blow me away with her or his prescience, kindness, compassion, vision and guidance.  The one who would give me the answers.  Who would tell me what to do to get to that place where I finally felt like I had “made it.”

So many others I knew had found one and their lives seemed so much better, more directed and purposeful for it, but that never happened to me. I would attend lectures, teachings, seminars, trainings and retreats and, inevitably, end up leaving early because some combination of information, integrity, pace or delivery did not resonate.  Why couldn’t I find that person?

It finally dawned upon me…

The person I was looking for was the one I would need to become.

That’s not to say I don’t seek out teachers and desire to learn. Others can offer guidance and insight. Classical texts like the Bhagavad Gita, the Bible, the Talmud, the Koran, The Tao De Ching and the occasional Bazooka Joe comic lend intelligence, humility and humor to the process of discovery. I am and will always be an eternal student.

But, I’m not driven by the quest to find and place upon a pedestal any single teacher who will make everything okay, show me the light or bless my decisions and actions and diminish uncertainty.

Because, in the end, no one else can stand in my shoes.

No one else can live my fears, dreams, love, relationships, desires, intellect, challenges, life and lifestyle.

No one else can enjoy or suffer the outcome of my decisions or actions.

No one else is better equipped to know me.

No one else can act but me.

Upon these realizations, I began to accept responsibility not only for my life to-date, but for the process of making it come alive from that point forward.  Not for anyone else.  For me. And, increasingly, for those I serve.

I continued to listen to conventional wisdom, but, realizing most who followed it ended up not more, but less fulfilled, I committed to forming my decisions another way.  I adopted a standard that guides nearly every major business decision I make.

Will this career choice allow me to spend the greatest amount of time absorbed in activities and relationships that make me come alive, while surrounding myself with people I cannot get enough of and earning what I need to live well in the world?

And, I also realized much of what makes not only me, but most people come alive comes from a place of service and impact.

When I started making decisions from this place, the world seemed to increasingly become my partner in the career adventure of a lifetime.

Does that mean everything started to come easily?  No.

In case you haven’t gathered, creating your life and livelihood to deliver maximum passion and prosperity is a gargantuan challenge.

But, it’s not about whether it’s hard or easy…it’s about whether it’s WORTH the effort.

And, the answer is a definitive yes.  Especially since recent advances in technology have made possible options and opportunities that simply did not exist even a few short years ago. Launching and scaling a meaningful professional path while minimizing risk has become so much easier.

I can’t tell you where or how it’s going to end.

Frankly, taking full responsibility for the state of my life and happiness still scares the hell out of me on a pretty regular basis.  Such is the nature of working the edge of convention and owning up to the inevitability of uncertainty.

But, it scares me far less than it would to turn my future over to someone else and simply hope for the best.

I have increasingly better-defined goals, core-qualities that are important to build around and experiences I want to bring to my and my family’s lives. But I have also discovered the wonder that presents itself, seemingly spontaneously, when you consistently act in alignment with your authentic Self, then open to relationships and opportunities you never saw coming.

I cannot conduct the balance of my life in a vacuum of inevitable regret.

I cannot imagine the sorrow of leaving this Earth one day filled with visions of a life I dreamed of living, but never had the will to try.

And, I cannot rest with the notion that, in my actions, I might have taught my daughter to do the same.

Like Helen Keller said,

Life is either a daring adventure, or nothing.

So.  What are you waiting for?

Ball’s in your court…

[This post was excerpted and expanded from my book, Career Renegade]

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80 responses

80 responses to “Be Your Own Guru”

  1. Judy Martin says:

    Jonathan,
    To me this is one of the most important posts you have ever shared, although I did read your book. I too was a seeker for a long time – and in fact bought into a lot of other people’s stuff at times in my life.

    There is always something to learn from others, but it can’t trump what we know to be true for ourselves.

    I’d like to believe that that “inner voice” is what Whitman had in mind when he wrote this…
    “Surely whoever speaks to me in the right voice, him or her I shall follow… as the water follows the moon silently with fluid steps… around the globe.”

  2. You aced this one – not that you need my confirmation. First time commenter, long time reader and follower. I too have spent the better part of 40 years in Fortune 500 with the right titles etc. – making everybody happy but myself. Plenty of resources but zero control and poorly invested time in endless political meetings. The last three years have been frightening (used up resources) and exciting and have taught me how to hustle again. Keep being true and we will all keep “falling forward.” I feel like I am on the cusp of breaking through my own barriers and building a better approach to investing energy in organizations – for profit and non-profit. As a thought partner, along with just a couple others, you have helped me immensely get my plans to ground. You made my day with this one. – Chris

  3. Julie_k says:

    This is actually the tagline for a business I’m starting. Taking that as a great omen.

  4. Debbie Ferm says:

    Oh my gosh. I’m trying, but it is such a long process. Like you, I am an eternal student. I love to absorb everything I can from all possible points of view.

    Nostalgia and regret sometimes get in the way. Then my brain will go streaking ahead and I am caught somewhere between the past and the future. But not the present. That’s my challenge, and I’m working on it:)

    I’m not certain I’ll ever be a guru, even in my own life, but at least I can be a good steward.

    Good thoughts,

    Debbie Ferm

  5. Tisha Morris says:

    I went through a similar realization. I was elated when I found that there is a Sanskrit word for this… it’s called “upaguru.”

    Namate~
    Tisha

  6. Sue says:

    Hi Jonathan,

    My understanding of a guru is that she or he is anyone who facilitates you or supports you in removing the ‘gu’ (Sanskrit for darkness or ignorance) through showing the light of eternal truths or guiding you with their wisdom. (A guru is literally a “gu remover”.) Being open to hearing the wisdom or input from a teacher–whether that person is an actual teacher or authority on a subject, our parents, our partners, a child in our lives, a book or our own inner discipline or intuition–is what helps us to become more conscious.

    I think sometimes it is helpful to have a teacher or a guide who can shed light on our blind spots. If we’re honest with ourselves, we all have those blind spots in our pysche or consciousness that we’d prefer not to examine, but our ignorance or willful blindness prevent us from seeing the whole picture and being able to make a good decision, so best to get some light in those dark places.

    There does seem to be a tendency for a lot of people to become slavish followers of their gurus (and a goodly number of gurus whose egos encourage such behaviour)and ask for advice before they so much as sneeze, but that really isn’t what the guru-student relationship is supposed to be about. A guru who has lost her or his humility and encourages dependence, rather than independent thinking, is a person who’s become mired in some interesting “goo” of their own.

    So on that cheery note, I’ll say namaste.

  7. Jesse says:

    Jonathan,

    You nailed it in this one. You know you are headed down the right path for YOU because you feel it. Not to sound corny, but you feel centered. There is No doubt, No uncertainty, No indecision. (Okay, there’s still a little of these three but they are now manageable.) You sleep better, smile easier, love more and can hardly wait to greet the day.

  8. Dave Soucy says:

    Jonathan,
    so well put. We’ve all been there (and sometimes still are). I know many friends who keep waiting to find that one guru who will make it right for them, and in the process they waste time doing nothing. You don’t need a guru to validate your actions. I’ve been there and done that. Freeing yourself from guru worship can be the thing that finally leads to real accomplishment. Thanks for stating this so eloquently.

    ~Dave

  9. Angela Wills says:

    Great post! And I have to say I wholeheartedly agree.

    Just last week I did a parody of ‘Dear Abby’ (an old country song) called ‘Dear Guru’ so your post really caught my attention.

    I guess it’s human nature to FIRST try it the easy way and just try to find someone who can just spell it all out for us. Then most people realize it’s not that easy and we do have to be our own guru – that’s where you find out who’s really in it for the long haul and who’s outta here.

    Here’s my silly song if you want to have a listen:
    http://www.marketersmojo.com/5720/dear-guru/

    Angela

  10. It’s a hard truth to grasp: following any guru beyond yourself will get you where that guru is headed — but never where you’re hoping to go. Your post makes the necessity of striking out on our own clear.

    • Thursday, after reading Jonathan’s post that is exactly what I was thinking.

      I don’t think you search and find a guru that has an impact on your life. If you’re fortunate to cross paths with one, great, but ultimately it would be a random meeting. So it’s better to not look and create your own path and should it intersect with someone who leaves a lasting impression, be thankful. Who knows, you may be the one who leaves the lasting impression.

  11. This goes straight to my heart! I also spent a lot of my younger years wishing for a guru – and then came to the same realization you wrote (so beautifully) about.

    Reminds me of Sheldon Kopp’s classic psych book:
    If You Meet the Buddha on the Road, Kill Him! ~ The Pilgrimage of Psychotherapy Patients which also speaks about this.

    Thanks for the reminder – love the way you condense such big lessons into such a few paragraphs (I have trouble with being succinct – and I am soooo impressed!)!!

  12. Wow, what a wake up call (literally as I got up this morning). Thanks for sharing Jonathan, this wisdom is greatly appreciated as I set out on new ventures.

  13. Patty K says:

    Yup. I spent a lot of time on the same search: books, workshops, people. I found myself adopting different concepts and ideas from various places or adapting things. Often times techniques that were useful for others simply didn’t work for me. (And don’t get me started on the whole lack of integrity thing…)

    Just a few weeks ago it finally dawned on me: there’s a reason why they call it *personal* growth. And @jesse – YES! That’s exactly what it feels like.

  14. Angela says:

    These words resonate with me completely today… It’s a good reminder whether you’re ending your search for a guru or, in my case, letting go of a need to convince others that the path I’m choosing is the right one despite the risks involved. As you said, no one else is better equipped to know that. Thanks!

  15. Beautiful post!!! How many people actually go through life without even asking this or a related type question? I started freaking out a bit recently when I realized I was saying to my friends things like- -“Do you remember doing so and so back in 6th grade 30 years ago…” HELP- -I AM GETTING OLDER- -BUT HOPEFULLY WISER.

    Thanks Jonathan.

    CARPE DIEM!

  16. Joe Dallas says:

    Nicely written Jonathan. This is something I realized a few years ago. There are some gurus who can guide you in a specific endeavor, rarely can you find one who speaks to all of your needs as a person growing into the real you.
    The realization of owning what we are and become brings with it a responsibility many are unwilling to bear. Yes, it is scary sometimes, but more often it is rewarding.
    Thanks for making me think about this.
    Joe

  17. Julie Roads says:

    I hate to say this, because it just sounds horrible and negative – but it’s really not – I’ve learned in the last year that you literally can’t depend on anyone but yourself. You just can’t. I won’t list the reasons why (maybe I’ll write a post about it…).

    And it’s at direct odds with the basic need we all have to be loved, appreciated and approved of. If we could only learn to love, appreciate and approve of ourselves…and therein lies the work and the rub – and hopefully, the glory.

    Fabulous post…

  18. Social comments and analytics for this post…

    This post was mentioned on Twitter by THGBusiness: Be Your Own Guru: Do not go where the path may lead; go instead where there is no path and leave a trail. ~ Ralph… http://bit.ly/b0vmqI

  19. The problem with most “gurus” is that they gladly let you abdicate your own responsibility to feed their own egos, which is a terrible quality in a teacher.

  20. Sandi says:

    Great post, Jonathan. We so often look for “the answers” in the approval and wisdom of others…sort of like the movie “The Yes Man” (hilarious, but painfully accurate seminar scene.) Time to say “Yes” to what we know to be true and trust in it.

  21. Kasey LaRose says:

    This seems to be one of the greatest self-truths; in the end, it really is on us. It is, what we make it and how we make it. I think at first, we all want someone to help us or even do it for us, but at some point we figure out that we can get a lot farther on our own. That doesn’t mean people can’t help along the way, and I think you can still depend on others, but you have to make your own path in defining what “it” is.

    Thanks for the great post! I stopped “looking” for gurus a while ago after reading articles like this.

  22. Janet says:

    At the risk of sounding like a total sycophant, this is one of the best blog posts I have ever read. I wish I had realized this insight when I was 20 rather than 20+ years later, but “better late than never” and I hope to teach my children the wisdom in what you’ve written.

  23. Lindsey says:

    This is my favorite thing you have ever written.
    Yes, we have to grow into the person we want to guide us. We have to be our own fundamental solace, inspiration, and friend. Yet you are right that taking responsibility for all of that is scary – like a freefall, with no more excuses to catch us or hide behind.
    I am very grateful for these words.

  24. This is a very important bit of information that for some reason doesn’t strike the right cord in many of us until we are truly ready to “hear” it. I am not sure if it is an age thing or a mindset thing, but it is very true that we spend a lot of time in our lives looking outside of ourselves for the person or thing that will give us all of the right answers. Then, one day it “magically” dawns upon us that we had the answers all along, we just weren’t listening. We are our own gurus, if we choose to listen and absorb the wisdom that lies within. Thank you for shining a light on this beautiful revelation!

  25. Coop says:

    Like others have said above, this is of your best posts. Right on target and a reminder for me to get my butt in gear.

  26. Simply put, Bravo!

    How odd is it that I had been pondering this very topic while trying to wake up with this morning’s first cup of coffee? Very cool. And timely.

    Many thanks!

  27. As others have said, this is such a fine post.

    The Jungian therapist and author James Hollis says the first half of our live we are trying to deal with the question, “What do I need to do to succeed?” The the second half, we have a new question. “Who am I?” I suspect that looking for gurus and then coming to look to ourselves is a developmental process.

  28. Alana says:

    I read this after returning from a meeting where I was working on turning vision into reality. I am taking a leap of faith and trusting that everything I have done and learned in my life have prepared me for this moment. I am excited and joyful to be taking this step. Knowing that others have gone before helps keep me in a place of trust. This post speaks to my soul. Thank you!

  29. Mick Morris says:

    Thanks Jonathon, I’m taking the ball out to the court of life. I plan to dribble, pass it around, shoot a few goals…

    This says it all…

    “Because, in the end, no one else can stand in my shoes.

    No one else can live my fears, dreams, love, relationships, desires, intellect, challenges, life and lifestyle.

    No one else can enjoy or suffer the outcome of my decisions or actions.

    No one else is better equipped to know me.”

    No one else can act but me.

  30. Jonathan, this is my first time on your blog, surprisingly it took me ahwile to get here:) and what a post! I could resonate with every word you’ve written. All the wisdom we need truly is within us already, we don’t need to seek outside. And the earlier we understand it and embrace our Authentic Selves, the more value we can bring to the world and the more meaningful our lives become. Thank you for this great read!

  31. Sally G. says:

    I am ‘so here’ in this moment with you right now. It takes tremendous courage to determine that you alone are enough to make your dreams come true. I’m working with Sarah Robinson right now to push past my final fear point (final as of now, anyway)and serve as best I can from the depths of my gifts … and I’m grateful for the access to your path along the way. Thank you …

  32. I love the balance of having many teachers and places to seek guidance, while not choosing any one (or even a few) as the way to be you.

    beautiful honest post
    thank you

  33. I so agree with choosing your own direction. So many influences in life can steer one away from being their own true person.

    It is a shorter and easier road to become someone else, discovering yourself requires traveling the unknown.

  34. bchase says:

    I appreciate this post. It was serendipitous in its timing. I have been reading several books, including Career Renegade, as I try to figure out how to get from where I am to where I want to be. Like you, I have spent no small amount of my life looking for that person who could be the mentor of mentors and help me see the path. Like you, I have found wisdom in a variety of sources but no singular guiding light. In addition, I have been hoping to find “the job” as well but, to date, have not yet landed it. I know what I think I want, job wise, but have not been able to cross a barrier I can’t entirely control. The questions that are forcing themselves to be faced are, what am I going to do if I don’t find “the mentor” and “the job” and how long am I prepared to wait for these perfect things to show up?
    This post and the questions it forced lifted my spirits after a difficult day.

  35. katherine says:

    What a great way of saying simply what can be complex. I’ll send all my job seeker clients to read this. Thank you!

  36. Trece says:

    Your first two paragraphs sum up my life to this point. And makes me so sad. Because I always thought that the fault lay in me; I never dreamed that it was they who were wrong, at least for me.
    At this point in my life, I am trying to figure out who I am and what is my bliss. That’s why I’m simply Trece.

  37. Topi says:

    I think you’ve crystalised a thought that has been coming to me for a while. For as long as I can remember I’ve been searching for a guru (in my mind, a “father figure”). Someone who would give me the answers. But recently, I’ve realised that I am the only person who has the answers for me. Which is very scary! However, I am completely with you, I don’t want to leave this life with regrets about what I didn’t do, and I absolutely want to teach my children to live to their fullest potential, which means I now have to do that myself! Thanks for a wonderful post.
    Topi

  38. ava diamond (@feistywoman) says:

    What a wonderful and thought provoking post, Jonathan. What came to mind for me was an expression from back in my training many years ago to become a religious science practitioner. I wish I could remember who it was attributed to…Ernest Homes? Raymond Charles Barker? Kennedy Shultz?

    “The thing you are looking for, is the thing you are looking with.” This was so profound for me. I’d spent many years looking for the next teacher, the next seminar, the next book to be “it.”

    It took a long time for me to discover what you put so beautifully in your post: “The person I was looking for was the one I would need to become.”

    Thanks for this reminder.

  39. Maggie Mae says:

    Great post. My guru is still evolving. In truth, should and always will be. That said, my vote for most meaningful lines (though I might swap out the word cannot for will not):

    “I cannot conduct the balance of my life in a vacuum of inevitable regret.

    I cannot imagine the sorrow of leaving this Earth one day filled with visions of a life I dreamed of living, but never had the will to try.

    And, I cannot rest with the notion that, in my actions, I might have taught my daughter to do the same.”

    There is no greater motivator for me than seeing my child look to me for guidance and wanting, wondering just how I can teach each of them to seek their own path and be their own guru! Thanks!

  40. Tara Mohr says:

    Thanks Jonathan – this is a really beautiful post.

    I couldn’t agree more that we all have to be our own mentors/gurus/compasses – while staying open to learning from others’ wisdom.
    There is a big difference between weaving the wisdom of others into our own lives, letting their thoughts inform and inspire and touch and help us – and turning over one’s path to a single authority or framework.

    I also love your point that it’s not about whether its hard or easy, but if it’s worth it. When I coach people, a lot of times the coaching leads them to leave a ho-hum job for more fulfilling work, to start the business, to take a risk.

    At some point early on the path, the big challenges show up. Sometimes failures, sometimes just really rough patches. As a coach, this moment used to scare me, but now I love it so much because we get to talk about: So, are you in it for the long haul? Are you going the distance with this? Or are you just up for it if its easy and full of one success after the next?

    When we choose this path in spite of its difficulty, what we are really doing is deeply committing – almost like a marriage – to our authentic selves. Here for the distance, for the ups and downs, because it’s worth it.

  41. Kim says:

    Like Seth Godin says: There is no map.

    I have to admit that I really wish there were a map!

  42. Joss says:

    Thank you for posting this. It’s exactly what I’ve been struggling with and the same conclusion I have come to. It’s always lovely to be affirmed in my own decisions.

    First time I comment, but I do follow your posts and find your advice sensible!

    joss

  43. Joel Libava says:

    Jonathan,

    Thank you.

    That was your best post ever.

    JL

  44. patrick says:

    Rather than a journey to such a wonderful and logical realization- wouldn’t it be wonderful if, at birth, someone whispered in your ear, ‘Do amazing things with incredible people’……..and it stuck?

  45. zmajeva says:

    That how I was looking for a perfect book that will change my life. It seems I found one, but then I realized that book I was looking for should be written by me. 🙂

  46. William Kerr says:

    I have been on both sides now and have found, 50 years on, that whether one is out on their own or within a corporation, the same mind set applies.

    Within the fortune 500 arena I believe one is still working for oneself. Climbing that ladder is not for the faint of heart when you enter that upper atmosphere. Many of the demands of the free lance worker are necessary and definitely required in the corporate setting if one is ‘really’ in the corporate world.

    Many of my greatest lessons have come from this world which I now use in my non corporate world. Switching back and forth between a free lance and corporate existence keeps me flexible. I’ve learned that the person, company, or organization with the greatest flexibility controls or is able to obtain the best advantage of any situation.

    In the famous words of Buckaroo Bonzai, “Where ever you go, there you are.” (I think I got the wording correct and if not, the spirit is right) Whether on the street or in the board room, it’s still just you serving which necessitates being at your best at all times.

    And, whether on the street or in the board room, if you’re not, “scared as hell on a regular basis,” you’re not pushing the envelope.

    And this is the guru that I think everyone is always after and, like myself, spend/spent so much time looking for. I think it’s called life, the greatest school in the world.

    Once again, thanks for the newsletter.

    William Kerr from Vancouver/Toronto Canada

  47. jacqueline says:

    You are going against the stream for sure – there are so many people out there selling themselves as the guru for you that it is overwhelming. I highly applaud your effort though because in this life we need to do great work not sit at the feet of others doing good work. We all offer a special gift and once we realize that and put it into action the world will be a better place. Nice post – Jacqueline

  48. Mia says:

    Thank you for this post – I found you today and this post and loved it. I too want to model this idea for my daughter. There are so many opportunities to fulfill passions and dreams and enrich lives… taking the risk is worth it.
    I look forward to reading more.

  49. Agreed. 100% Sometimes I find myself waiting for someone to give me the answers, tell me what to do. Then I (figuratively) give myself a slap in the face, wake myself up and kick ass all on my own.

    With the occasional piece of advice along the way 😉

  50. […] Tweets about this great post on TwittLink.com […]

  51. […] March 24, 2010 at 12:13 am (Uncategorized) Jonathan Fields over at Awake@the Wheel recently presented this offering: Be your own Guru. […]

  52. John Soares says:

    It’s very important to always keep your internal center and not give away your power to someone else.

    Have teachers, have mentors, have colleagues, have friends.

    But no gurus.

  53. Werner says:

    This fantastic post is the epitome of the Gandhi quote:

    “Be the change you want to see in the world.”

  54. […] From Awake at the Wheel: Be Your Own Guru “I spent the better part of the first 40-years of my life looking for a guru, that person who would just blow me away with her or his prescience, kindness, compassion, vision and guidance.  The one who would give me the answers.  Who would tell me what to do to get to that place where I finally felt like I had “made it.” So many others I knew had found one and their lives seemed so much better, more directed and purposeful for it, but that never happened to me. I would attend lectures, teachings, seminars, trainings and retreats and, inevitably, end up leaving early because some combination of information, integrity, pace or delivery did not resonate.  Why couldn’t I find that person?” […]

  55. Thanks for this inspirational post Jonathan! A great reminder that our fate is up to us and we must rely on ourselves and believe in ourselves to get what we want.

  56. Renee Morrison says:

    Thanks Jonathan,

    Great advice to be grounded, and to make decisions from that place of awareness you talk about.

    A place where you take the sole responsibility for your life. Your words are so true, “No one else can live my fears, dreams, love, relationships, desires, intellect, challenges, life and lifestyle. No one else can enjoy or suffer the outcome of my decisions or actions. No one else is better equipped to know me. No one else can act but me.”

    I am 40, and I make more mistakes than ever before (partially because I was afraid to try). I am addressing and dealing with my fears one at a time, and I am on the path to becoming more of my Authentic self every day. Thanks for further inspiration! ~Renee

  57. […] wrote a thought-provoking article this week called Be Your Own Guru at his site Awake @ The Wheel. This is a great post about taking personal responsibility for your […]

  58. […] Be Your Own Guru: Because, in the end, no one else can stand in my shoes. No one else can live my fears, dreams, […]

  59. Moon Hussain says:

    And so I’m late to the party, again! Jonathan, nice to meet you 🙂

    Like you, I’ve always wanted someone I can look up to, someone who can guide me but I’ve realized there’s no one else who has been through what I’m going through. Maybe there are, but I haven’t found them…?

    So it’s better to look into yourself and grow and become who you want to be. My $0.02.

  60. butterfly says:

    This is so true an we alone can be our own guru, we cannot always place value or importance of what others say or guide us to do, but we can follow our hearts and style. I am on that path as we speak and I am learning so much about me than ever in my life. Send me shout if you ever want a chat.

  61. Shannon Paul says:

    Totally off topic, but can I just tell you how excited I am to be on the same panel with you at SOBCon? Seriously. Very excited!

  62. […] wait for someone else to come and clean up your mess, Be Your Own Guru, writes Jonathan […]

  63. […] I asked you to consider being your own guru. And, most understood that was more a call to action to actively engage in the quest for knowledge, […]

  64. Anne Wayman says:

    Love this… found it from a link on today’s post (4-6-10)and it’s a lesson I’ve learned for myself along the way. Love it when someone agrees with me.

  65. Thea says:

    “I took the road less traveled which, as it turns out, there are no motels on it or anything.”

  66. […] – Career Renegade, cartea dar si blogul, unde veti gasi cu siguranta suficiente povesti ale oamenilor care au reusit sa faca schimbari, povesti care ofera inspiratie […]

  67. Omg that is so strange I was thinking the exact thought the other day. You look for a person to become and slowly you become that person yourself. it’s an amazing experience to see yourself becoming the man you once so desperately needed to guide you in your earlier life.

  68. […] One of the best blogs I’ve seen in terms of generating interesting comments is Awake @ the Wheel by Jonathan Fields – here’s a great post and example of a conversation:  Be your own guru. […]

  69. One of the very first books on spirituality that I remember reading was Be Your Own Guru by Betty Bethards. This post reminded me of finding that light from within and knowing everything you need is inside you. Thanks for that! 🙂

  70. […] there is a set of rules you must start to follow or a leader whom you should pick as your guru (be your own guru instead!). I’m talking about a new mindset where you tell yourself: “I am a minimalist. Now, […]

  71. […] it’s easy to be overwhelmed!  There are so many “shoulds” and “gurus” out there, we forget that we’re the only expert in our life. At the end of the day, we have to sort through all the valuable information we receive and decide […]

  72. […] I have to thank Jonathan Fields, author of Career Renegade, for this bit of knowledge. […]

  73. […] Be Your Own Guru by Jonathan Fields. […]

  74. […] Jonathan Fields over at Awake@the Wheel recently presented this offering: Be your own Guru. […]

  75. Mo Neville says:

    I am a bit late to the party here – but the “Be Your Own Guru” grabbed my attention immediately. You have so eloquently summarized the very same conclusion I recently came to myself. Wise people are wonderful teachers – but there is no greater guide than the sound of your own voice. Thanks for the poignant message Jonathan. Big fan
    -Mo